Dispatches from a failing state (from Wandering Gaia)

JohnsonBusThe Leave campaign used brilliant iconography; a pampered Old Etonian disguised as an ordinary bloke, either wearing a hard hat or at the wheel of a Labour red London bus carrying a mendacious advertisement, despite the fact that both Labour and London supported Remain. Its more disreputable wing also used emotional linkage between East European immigrants and immigrants from the Muslim world, as in the notorious Daily Mail front page showing Afghans intercepted in a people-smuggling lorry under the headline “We’re from Europe; let us in”.

For decades, Progressives like Lakoff (“Don’t Think of an Elephant”) have been telling us of the importance of framing our arguments. The point has been well taken, unfortunately, not by his intended audience but by their opponents. It is time we woke up.

A comment on the Remain campaign. I am a scientist, a strong Remain supporter, and take some trouble to keep myself reasonably well-informed. Yet I did not know, until I read Wandering Gaia’s post below, that 17 Nobel Prize scientists had come out for Remain. Something is wrong.

And an uneasy comment on how some of my Remain friends have reacted to the vote; insulting those whom you have failed to convince is not necessarily the most constructive response.

Wandering Gaia

There’s been a trend over the past decade in translating forgotten Eastern European plays from the 1930s and 40s, resetting them in a contemporary Britain and staging them to new London audiences. The problem I’ve always found with these adaptations is that the plays – often satires – only really make sense in the context of the time and place for which they were written. Emerging into a relaxed 21st century London after curtainfall, stretches the “it could happen here” premise too far.

The events of of the past week have undone this certainty – have undone me.

As I write, Britain faces a deep economic recession with cuts areas already struggling in the wake of years of austerity policy, including our cherished National Health Service, social care, transport and infrastructure, housing, regeneration for deprived areas, education and environmental services. Food, energy, oil prices are set to rise. Jobs will…

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About Paul Braterman

Science writer, former chemistry professor; committee member British Centre for Science Education; board member and science adviser Scottish Secular Society; former member editorial board, Origins of Life, and associate, NASA Astrobiology Insitute; first popsci book, From Stars to Stalagmites 2012

Posted on June 27, 2016, in Politics, Science and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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